Managing from the Middle: Leading Through Change

Through our work with rural hospitals, a need has emerged for education directed towards mid-level managers (MLMs) on the ‘why’ and ‘how’ of value-based care and population health, as well as tools and strategies to help MLMs lead others in this time of change.

Mid-level managers play a unique role in the transition to value and serve as a critical link between senior hospital leadership and front-line staff. In many rural hospitals, MLMs are often promoted from highly skilled technical roles and can benefit from resources that help them to develop the knowledge and skills to successfully lead change.

With the support of the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, this six-part podcast series was developed by the Small Rural Hospital Transition (SRHT) Project. The audience for these podcasts is MLMs from clinical and non-clinical departments. Our podcast guests are MLMs from rural hospitals as well as subject matter experts who will share best practices to prepare MLMs to lead through this time of significant change in the health care environment.

Podcasts | iTunes | Google Play

Podcast #1: Mid-level Managers’ Role in the Transition to Value

Featuring Terry Hill, MPA, Senior Advisor for Leadership & Policy, National Rural Health Resource Center and MLM Kyle Southerland, Project Management and Community Health, Bacon County Hospital in Alma, GA

Listeners will begin to understand the transition to value-based care and population health and why mid-level management plays a critical role.

Podcast #2: Working Through Change

Featuring Shannon Studden, Senior Program Specialist, National Rural Health Resource Center and Michelle Madrid and Wesley Babers, MLMs from White Mountain Regional Medical Center in Springerville, AZ

Hear perspectives on change models, how they show up throughout the change process, and why they’re important. 

Podcast #3: A Leader’s Role

Featuring Shannon Studden, Senior Program Specialist, National Rural Health Resource Center and Jessica Camacho, Director of Business Office at Roosevelt General Hospital in Portales, NM

This podcast focuses on leaders’ primary responsibilities throughout the change process, including setting the vision, communicating regularly, role modeling, and recognizing where people are on the change curve.  

Podcast #4: Helping Others to Navigate the Change Process

Featuring Shannon Studden, Senior Program Specialist, National Rural Health Resource Center and Fheb Garcia, Director of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation at Roosevelt General Hospital in Portales, NM

Guests discuss strategies for supporting others through change by addressing individual differences within teams, working through resistance, and leading from the heart.

Podcast #5: Managing Emotions During Change

Featuring Shannon Studden, Senior Program Specialist and Rhonda Barcus, Program Manager from the National Rural Health Resource Center and Micala Dempcy, Director of Obstetrics at Lexington Regional Health Center in Lexington, NE

This podcast addresses the challenges leaders face with managing their own emotions during change. Guests share best practices for strengthening emotional intelligence, building resilience and role-modeling while leading a group through a change.

Podcast #6: Change Management Through the Transition to Value

Featuring Terry Hill, Senior Advisor for Leadership & Rural Health Policy, Shannon Studden, Senior Program Specialist, and Rhonda Barcus, Program Manager at the National Rural Health Resource Center

In this final podcast of the series, we will share common themes from Episodes 1-5 and wrap up the series.

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB1RH24206, Information Services to Rural Hospital Flexibility Program Grantees, $1,009,121 (0% financed with nongovernmental sources). This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.