Mid-level Management’s Role in the Transition to Value

June 2020
Author: 
National Rural Health Resource Center (The Center)

Podcast release date: June 23, 2020

In this inaugural episode of Managing from the Middle: Leading Through Change 6-part podcast series, listeners will begin to understand the transition to value-based care and population health and why mid-level management plays a critical role. Joining the conversation are Kyle Southerland, Special Projects and Community Health Coordinator with Bacon County Hospital in Georgia and Terry Hill, Senior Advisor for Rural Health Leadership and Policy at the National Rural Health Resource Center.

“You first have to realize that there is a change that is relevant, not just to leadership or mid-level managers, it’s relevant to the entire organization.”

~Kyle Southerland

Podcast Guests:

Terry Hill, Senior Advisor for Leadership & Rural Health Policy, National Rural Health Resource Center

Terry Hill grew up in Central Alaska about 200 miles away from the nearest hospital or clinic, so he comes to rural health with that background.

Terry has been working with rural hospitals across the country for the last 30 years and is the founder of the National Rural Health Resource Center. He has moved to a senior advisor role but continues to work with rural hospitals in every state helping rural hospitals make the transition to value.   

 

Kyle Southerland, Project Management and Community Health, Bacon County Hospital, Alma, GA

Kyle grew up in rural Southeast Georgia in a town referred to as the Blueberry Capital of Georgia. The population is less than 4,000, and the health system is the largest employer in the county. He returned home in May of 2017 for an internship at Bacon County Hospital and Health System and was a full-time employee by August. Kyle's role involves project management and community engagement.

Kyle Southerland serves as the Special Projects and Community Health Coordinator for Bacon County Hospital and Health System in Alma, Georgia. His role includes ownership of multiple projects in population health, community engagement, and quality improvement. Kyle holds a bachelor’s degree in Business – Healthcare Management, and he is working on both Master of Health Administration and Master of Business Administration degrees. Kyle is passionate about population health, and he is inspired by patient-centered care and the power that access to health information holds in improving the health efficacy of consumers.

This project is/was supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number UB1RH24206, Information Services to Rural Hospital Flexibility Program Grantees, $1,205,000 (0% financed with nongovernmental sources). This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.